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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: tropical milkweed

How to Find a Monarch Egg

A female monarch fluttering around in the garden section of a home improvement store in Vacaville. She laid a number of eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What are the odds? Here you are, standing in the garden section of a home improvement store, and you select a tropical milkweed to purchase. You place it on the ground and admire the brilliant yellow blossoms and luxurious green foliage. It's the best...

A female monarch fluttering around in the garden section of a home improvement store in Vacaville. She laid a number of eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female monarch fluttering around in the garden section of a home improvement store in Vacaville. She laid a number of eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female monarch fluttering around in the garden section of a home improvement store in Vacaville. She laid a number of eggs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug, Ladybug, Fly Away Home!

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised  for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug!  Ladybug!Fly away home.Your house is on fireAnd your children are gone. How many times have you heard that nursery rhyme? Better yet, how many times have you seen a lady beetle (because they're beetles, not bugs) take off? Look closely...

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised  for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Why Friday the 13th Is Not an Unlucky Day

A male monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed on Friday the 13th in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Friday the 13th is not an unlucky day--not when migratory monarchs make a pit stop at your home on their way to their overwintering sites. Today a male monarch fluttered into our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif., and sipped nectar from a tropical...

A male monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed on Friday the 13th in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed on Friday the 13th in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed on Friday the 13th in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch spreads its wings on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch spreads its wings on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch spreads its wings on a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 13, 2017 at 6:13 PM

The Sneaky Cuckoo Bee

A cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, sips nectar from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You could call it a slacker, a deadbeat, a moocher, a sponger, or a loafer. Or you could call it a cuckoo bee. Take the cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, a parasite of the digger bee, Anthophora. When the female Anthophora leaves its nest to...

A cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, sips nectar from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, sips nectar from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, sips nectar from a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Anthophora urbana, sips nectar from lavender. The cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, is a parasite of Anthophora. It lays eggs in the host's nest, resulting in death of the host's offspring. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A digger bee, Anthophora urbana, sips nectar from lavender. The cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, is a parasite of Anthophora. It lays eggs in the host's nest, resulting in death of the host's offspring. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, Anthophora urbana, sips nectar from lavender. The cuckoo bee, Xeromelecta californica, is a parasite of Anthophora. It lays eggs in the host's nest, resulting in death of the host's offspring. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 2:07 PM

Top-Bar Beekeeping Advocate Les Crowder to Speak at WAS Conference at UC Davis

Les Crowder examines a frame from his top-bar hive. A resident of Austin, Texas, he will speak Sept. 7 at the Western Apicultural Society conference at UC Davis.

Are top-bar beekeeping hives for you? What are their advantages and disadvantages as compared to the traditional Langstroth hives? You'll learn all about top-bar hives when Les Crowder of Austin, Texas, discusses "Major Considerations in Top Bar Hive...

Les Crowder examines a frame from his top-bar hive. A resident of Austin, Texas, he will speak Sept. 7 at the Western Apicultural Society conference at UC Davis.
Les Crowder examines a frame from his top-bar hive. A resident of Austin, Texas, he will speak Sept. 7 at the Western Apicultural Society conference at UC Davis.

Les Crowder examines a frame from his top-bar hive. A resident of Austin, Texas, he will speak Sept. 7 at the Western Apicultural Society conference at UC Davis.

A honey bee heads over the top of  a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads over the top of a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads over the top of a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 3:50 PM

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