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Posts Tagged: spiders

Congrats to UC Davis Doctoral Students Who Study Spiders: AAS Awards

Rebecca Godwin with a statue of Theodore Roosevelt at the American Museum of Natural History, where she did some of her research. She won first place in the student poster research competiion at the recent meeting of the American Arachnological Society.

Chances are you're not thinking about spiders right now, but arachnid experts at the University of California, Davis, are. Two doctoral students from the Jason Bond laboratory, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, won first- and...

What's for Dinner? How About a Green Bottle Fly?

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? A crab spider, camouflaged in our lavender patch, didn't catch a honey bee, a butterfly, an ant or a syrphid fly. No, it nailed a green bottle fly. We couldn't help but notice. The fly's metallic blue-green coloring stood in sharp...

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 at 4:53 PM

Golden Orbweavers Ignore Biological Rules

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Size does matter. Have you ever wondered about sexual size dimorphism in the tropical spiders, the golden orbweavers? The females are sometimes 10 times larger and 100 times heavier than their male counterparts. And the webs that the females ...

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)
A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Why You Should Love Spiders--Or at Least Like Them!

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We recently posted information about the Bohart Museum of Entomology's upcoming open house on "Eight-Legged Wonders," and several people responded that they absolutely HATE spiders, and that we should have prefaced it with a SPOILER ALERT: "SPIDER...

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Don't Miss 'Eight-Legged Wonders' Open House on March 9 at Bohart Museum, UC Davis

UC Davis professor Jason Bond in his office in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've heard of the Seven Wonders of the World. But have you heard of the "Eight-Legged Wonders?" You won't want to miss the "Eight-Legged Wonders" open house from 1 to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 9 at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of...

UC Davis professor Jason Bond in his office in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond in his office in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond in his office in the Academic Surge Building. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eye-to-eye with a jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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