Trinity County Cooperative Extension
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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: rock purslane

Syrphid Fly in Rock Purslane: When a House Is a Home

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a house is a home... Take the case of a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly. It's a cold and windy day, and it's tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif.It's sipping nectar, and rotating its...

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more  sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Tags: flower fly (12), hover fly (19), pollinator (3), rock purslane (18), syrphid fly (17), UC ANR (15)

Seeing Red: Holiday Red

Honey bee with red pollen (from neighboring rock purslane) sipping nectar from lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, Virginia, there is such a thing as "red pollen." Like people, pollen comes in many colors and all are beautiful. All. The floral source determines the color of the pollen. Just as nectar is a carbohydrate source, pollen is a protein source....

Honey bee with red pollen (from neighboring rock purslane) sipping nectar from lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee with red pollen (from neighboring rock purslane) sipping nectar from lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee with red pollen (from neighboring rock purslane) sipping nectar from lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee, packing red pollen, returning to a rock purslane blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee, packing red pollen, returning to a rock purslane blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee, packing red pollen, returning to a rock purslane blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, December 25, 2013 at 10:07 AM
Tags: honey bee (195), lavender (27), Merry Christmas (2), red pollen (6), rock purslane (18)

In the Blink of an Eye

Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, prepares to leave one flower for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the blink of an eye, they visit the rockpurslane (Calandrinia grandiflora).Now you see them, now you don't.They're a  sweat bee, a little larger than most sweat bees, but a little smaller than a honey bee.Halictus farinosus (family Halictidae)...

Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, prepares to leave one flower for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, prepares to leave one flower for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, prepares to leave one flower for another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, foraging in rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, foraging in rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sweat bee, Halictus farinosus, foraging in rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 9:58 PM

Getting the Red Out

Honey bee packing red pollen from rockpurslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Where do bees get red pollen?" we were asked. "We've seen bees packing blood-red pollen at the entrance to a hive."Well, one flower that yields red pollen is rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora). It's a drought-tolerant perennial, a...

Honey bee packing red pollen from rockpurslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee packing red pollen from rockpurslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee packing red pollen from rockpurslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee heading toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee heading toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee heading toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 4, 2012 at 10:24 PM

An Uncommon Bee

Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes you get lucky.While watching floral visitors foraging last week in our rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora), we noticed a tiny black bee, something we'd never seen before.Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of...

Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, on rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, exiting rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, exiting rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female leafcutting bee, Megachile gemula, exiting rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 21, 2012 at 10:28 PM

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