Trinity County Cooperative Extension
University of California
Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: praying mantis

Learn How to Raise Praying Mantids, Butterflies and Other Insects

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Ever wanted to raise praying mantids, butterflies, silkworm moths and other insects? Or arachnids such as tarantulas? Scientists at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology will help you do just that. They've scheduled an open house on “Arthropod...

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)
Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just Look, Don't Take?

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When we last left Ms. Mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata residing in our verbena patch, she was munching on a honey bee. A successful ambush stalker, she was. But not always. Her plan to take down a duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, didn't go so...

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 4:06 PM

Victory in the Verbena

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, I'm hungry. A female praying mantis is perched upside down in our pollinator garden. She has maintained this position in the verbena over a four-day period, enduring temperatures that soar to 105 degrees. The mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as...

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 3:00 PM

A 'Star' Is Born and Then....

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We rarely see an adult praying mantis until late summer or fall. Their offspring are out there, though. And sometimes we see life go full circle. On Sept. 23, 2018, we watched a Mama Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis entomology...

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

First-instar praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by UC Davis praying mantis expert and entomology student Lohit Garikpati. Photograph taken May 13 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How tiny is the first-instar? This tiny. And that's a red spider mite that crawled onto the dime. Note the chunk of abdomen missing on the first-instar--probably due to sibling cannibalism. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was a very gravid mantis, Stagmomantis limbata on Sept. 24, 2018. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mama mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an ootheca or egg case on a redwood stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 3, 2019 at 7:12 PM

Henrietta and the Drone Fly: The Predator and the Prey

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, perches on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). She is as patient as she is persistent. The drone fly, aka syrphid and also known as a hover fly or flower fly, makes the fatal mistake of touching down on...

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta, our Stagmomantis limbata praying mantis, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia.) (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly (syrphid) lands on the blossom as a hungry praying mantis watches intently. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One quick move and praying mantis has dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The spiked forelegs hold the prey in place. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's eat and be eaten in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Henrietta the praying mantis polishes off the last of the fly but a wing is visible evidence of what happened. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 8, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Food Yard & Garden

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: cetrinity@ucdavis.edu