Trinity County Cooperative Extension
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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: caterpillar

Saving a Butterfly: In a World Where Kindness Matters

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a long awaited process, but it's a girl! And she's beautiful! It all began with finding two anise swallowtail chrysalids clinging last July to the fennel stems in our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. To protect them from predators and the...

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly eclosed anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 16, 2018 at 3:39 PM

Independence Day for a Monarch

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a monarch butterfly eclose? It's a magical moment. First an egg, then a caterpillar, then a chrysalis, and then a butterfly, Danaus plexippus. We took some images of a monarch eclosing back on Sept. 10, 2016. It was late in the...

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm  swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 at 10:54 AM
Focus Area Tags: Innovation Natural Resources

California Wild Fires Raging...but Life Cycles Go On...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As those horrendous wild fires continue to rage throughout California, as Cal Fire helicopters roar over, as residents scramble from their homes,  as smoke thickens the air, and as ashes flutter down like feathers, it's difficult to think about...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 5:00 PM

It's Chrysalis Time in the City

It's chrysalis time in the city. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Our unseasonably warm temperatures in November yielded 12 unexpected surprises:  12 monarch caterpillars munching away on the tropical milkweed in our pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. Didn't they get the memo? So we brought them in,...

It's chrysalis time in the city. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's chrysalis time in the city. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's chrysalis time in the city. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Santa appears to be looking at the newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Santa appears to be looking at the newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Santa appears to be looking at the newly eclosed male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Happy holidays from an out-of-season monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Happy holidays from an out-of-season monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Happy holidays from an out-of-season monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2016 at 6:25 PM

They Didn't Get the Memo

Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They didn't get the memo. Summer is over. Fall is underway. Winter is coming (Dec. 21). But the Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are still laying eggs on the passionflower vine here in Vacaville, Calif. The eggs are hatching. The caterpillars are...

Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar in November. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar in November. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar in November. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tiny Gulf Fritillary egg. The egg is about the size of a sesame seed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tiny Gulf Fritillary egg. The egg is about the size of a sesame seed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tiny Gulf Fritillary egg. The egg is about the size of a sesame seed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No Gulf Fritillary will ever eclose from this chrysalis. Note the parasitoid hole. It was a large parasitoid--a big tachinid fly or an ichneumonid or wasp--says Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No Gulf Fritillary will ever eclose from this chrysalis. Note the parasitoid hole. It was a large parasitoid--a big tachinid fly or an ichneumonid or wasp--says Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No Gulf Fritillary will ever eclose from this chrysalis. Note the parasitoid hole. It was a large parasitoid--a big tachinid fly or an ichneumonid or wasp--says Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 4:41 PM
Tags: adult (6), Art Shapiro (176), caterpillar (14), chrysalis (14), cycle of life (1), egg (9), Gulf Fritillaries (14), passionflower vine (33)

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