Trinity County Cooperative Extension
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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: UC ANR

Syrphid Fly in Rock Purslane: When a House Is a Home

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a house is a home... Take the case of a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly. It's a cold and windy day, and it's tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif.It's sipping nectar, and rotating its...

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, tucked in the folds of a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more  sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly rotates its body to gather more nectar glean more sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syprhid is just about ready to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 at 11:00 AM
Tags: flower fly (12), hover fly (19), pollinator (3), rock purslane (18), syrphid fly (17), UC ANR (15)

Sorry, This Blossom Is Taken

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this male longhorned bee (Svastra) sipping a little nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). As the late Mr. Rogers (1928-2003), star of the TV show, "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," so often proclaimed:  "It's a beautiful day in the...

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Svastra dive-bombs another male on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). This image was taken with a fast shutter speed of 1/3200 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following the dive-bombing, the male Svastra kept occupying the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody Loves Bugs, Right? Here Are the Top 25 Bug Blogs in the World

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody loves bugs, right? Well, no, they don't. Some folks scream, smash them, or sprint away from them. Other folks--including yours truly--sprint toward them, not unlike firefighters racing into a burning building while everyone else is dashing...

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. Native to western North America, it belongs to the family Libellulidae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a
Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the flameskimmer dragonfly, also called a "firecracker skimmer." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flameskimmer in flight as he heads back to his perch, a bamboo stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Bumble Bee on Mustard in the Golden State

A pollen-laded yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, buzzes toward a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's better than a yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) on yellow mustard? Not much. Both are signs of early spring. Mustard is popping up all over, along with oxalyis and wild radish. The earth is warming. Spring is here. Get ready. In the...

A pollen-laded yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, buzzes toward a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-laded yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, buzzes toward a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-laded yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, buzzes toward a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Coming in for a landing! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Coming in for a landing! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Coming in for a landing! A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It doesn't get any better than this. Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It doesn't get any better than this. Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It doesn't get any better than this. Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii) lands on a mustard blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 5:22 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Natural Resources

Wonderful News for the CA Master Beekeeper Program!

Elina Lastro Niño (left) tests a prospective graduate of the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, how much this is needed! Congratulations to the California Master Beekeeper Program, the newly announced recipient of a $199,949 grant from the UC Agricultural and Natural Resources through its 2017 Competitive Grants Program.  California...

Elina Lastro Niño (left) tests a prospective graduate of the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Elina Lastro Niño (left) tests a prospective graduate of the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Elina Lastro Niño (left) tests a prospective graduate of the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Charley Nye (right), manager of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, scores an applicant in the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beekeeper Charley Nye (right), manager of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, scores an applicant in the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Charley Nye (right), manager of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, scores an applicant in the California Master Beekeeper Program. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 11, 2017 at 4:43 PM

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