Trinity County Cooperative Extension
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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Posts Tagged: Syrphidae

Hovering in the Wind

Syrphid fly nectaring on tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The 40 mile-per-hour howling wind didn't seem to bother the syrphid fly, aka hover fly and flower fly.     It clung to a blossom on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, and proceeded to nectar. Its wings sparkled in the morning sun. This...

Syrphid fly nectaring on tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Syrphid fly nectaring on tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid fly nectaring on tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid sparkles in the early morning sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Syrphid sparkles in the early morning sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid sparkles in the early morning sun. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 2, 2013 at 9:30 PM

Flies Are Pollinators, Too!

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You may have noticed this little floral visitor in your garden. It might appear to be a bee, a common mistake to the untrained eye or those who think that all floral visitors are bees. But it's a fly, and flies are pollinators, too! This fly, from the...

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a fly, genus Eristalis, on a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies are pollinators, too! This little Eristalis is nectaring a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of an Eristalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 9:04 PM

Syrphids Back Again

Honing In

Have you seen the little syrphid flies, aka flower flies and hover flies, hovering around the early spring blossoms? We saw half a dozen of them Monday, Feb. 15 nectaring a white ceanothus at the Marshall Post Office in Marin County. The ceanothus is a...

Honing In
Honing In

A SYRPHID FLY (problably from the Genus Toxomerus) heads toward a white ceanothus blossom near Tomales Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Glitter
Glitter

WINGS GLITTERING in the sun, a syrphid fly lands on a white ceanothus blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 16, 2010 at 8:16 PM
Tags: flower fly (12), Robbin Thorp (230), Robert Bugg (4), syrphid fly (17), Syrphidae (8), Toxomerus (1)

Hovering

Hover fly on rock purslane

The warmth of the sun and the lure of nectar beckoned the hover flies or flower flies to our bee friendly garden.We saw this one nectaring the rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora) last weekend. Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus...

Hover fly on rock purslane
Hover fly on rock purslane

HOVER FLY, aka flower fly, nectars the rock purslane. The insect is from the family Syrphidae, and probably genus Platycheirus, according to native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nectar Lover
Nectar Lover

THIS hover fly, aka flower fly, reaches for more nectar from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for Take-Off
Ready for Take-Off

READY FOR TAKE-OFF, the hover fly, crowned with pollen, heads for the tip of the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 30, 2009 at 8:48 PM
Tags: hover fly (19), Platycheirus (1), Robbin Thorp (230), rockpurslane (1), Syrphidae (8)

Squatters' Rights

Fly-In

Squatters' rights. A dandelion poking through the rocks near Nick's Cove on Tomales Bay, in Marshall, Sonoma County, seemed an unlikely host for squatters' rights. It first drew a tiny bee, barely a quarter-inch long. It was a female sweat bee, family...

Fly-In
Fly-In

HOVER FLY, from the family Syrphidae swoops down on a dandelion claimed by a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two's Company
Two's Company

TWO'S COMPANY--A tiny sweat bee and a hover fly share the same dandelion. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On the Rim
On the Rim

POLLEN-PACKING sweat bee (top) prepares to leave the dandelion to the much larger hover fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Alone
Alone

ALONE, the hover fly nectars the dandelion flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2009 at 5:39 PM
Tags: dandelion (1), hover fly (19), Lasioglossum (6), Sonoma County (2), sweat bee (18), Syrphidae (8)

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