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Posts Tagged: UC Davis

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says an international team of 16 researchers, including several UC Davis scientists,...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Do You Know Where Your Pollinators Are?

European paper wasps protecting the nest they're building on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's National Pollinator Week. Do you know where your pollinators are? If you're thinking bees, butterflies, beetles, birds (hummingbirds) and bats, you're correct. But what about European paper wasps (Polistes dominula)? They're pollinators, too, says...

European paper wasps protecting the nest they're building on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasps protecting the nest they're building on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps protecting the nest they're building on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasp chowing down on food on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. Another wasp delivered it to the guard. Maybe it's the remains of a caterpillar? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasp chowing down on food on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. Another wasp delivered it to the guard. Maybe it's the remains of a caterpillar? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasp chowing down on food on the lip of a recycling bin near the Mann lab, UC Davis campus. Another wasp delivered it to the guard. Maybe it's the remains of a caterpillar? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at 4:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

The Bee and the Butterfly

A honey bee and a Painted Lady share a mustard blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The bee and the butterfly. The honey bee and the Painted Lady. Apis mellifera and Vanessa cardui.They both wanted to sip that sweet nectar from a mustard blossom. The Painted Lady was there first. Sometimes it's "first come, first served" and...

A honey bee and a Painted Lady share a mustard blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a Painted Lady share a mustard blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a Painted Lady share a mustard blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the Painted :ady. How sweet the nectar! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee edges closer to the Painted :ady. How sweet the nectar! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the Painted :ady. How sweet the nectar! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up, up and away. The honey bee buzzes over the butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's up, up and away. The honey bee buzzes over the butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up, up and away. The honey bee buzzes over the butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 at 4:23 PM

A Bee-Line to the Bohart Museum: T-Shirts and Calendars

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Folks are making a bee-line to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, for its spring sale. All proceeds support the insect museum in its educational and outreach activities. The gift shop is offering a selection of...

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 18, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Family Innovation

Painted Ladies: What a Delight to See!

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectars on five-spot, Nemophilia maculate, Wednesday afternoon, in the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG), UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In between the rains today, we saw them. So beautiful!  Painted ladies, Vanessa cardui, nectaring in patches of colorful wildflowers in the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG), located behind the Mann Laboratory on University of...

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectars on five-spot, Nemophilia maculate, Wednesday afternoon, in the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG), UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectars on five-spot, Nemophilia maculate, Wednesday afternoon, in the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG), UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady, Vanessa cardui, nectars on five-spot, Nemophilia maculate, Wednesday afternoon, in the Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG), UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tidy tips, Layia platyglossa, in the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG) drew painted ladies, Vanessa cardui, on  Wednesday afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tidy tips, Layia platyglossa, in the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG) drew painted ladies, Vanessa cardui, on Wednesday afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tidy tips, Layia platyglossa, in the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG) drew painted ladies, Vanessa cardui, on Wednesday afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sign welcomes visitors to the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG). It is located behind Lot 26, behind the Mann Laboratory, off Kleiber Hall Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sign welcomes visitors to the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG). It is located behind Lot 26, behind the Mann Laboratory, off Kleiber Hall Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sign welcomes visitors to the UC Davis Biological Orchard and Gardens (BOG). It is located behind Lot 26, behind the Mann Laboratory, off Kleiber Hall Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at 5:20 PM

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