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Posts Tagged: Steve Seybold

If You Fuse Art With Science, This Is for You!

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture.  The occasion: a  show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you fuse art with science, this is for you.  Like to draw, paint, or photograph insects? Or use other mediums, including textiles, sculpture, video and mixed media? Or engage in other science/art subjects? You're invited to enter...

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture.  The occasion: a  show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture. The occasion: a show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture. The occasion: a show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly  (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 9, 2017 at 5:37 PM

The Day That The Beetles Invaded the Bohart

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "The Day that the Beetles Invaded the Bohart." That would be the recent open house at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, on "Bark Beetles and Forest Health," coordinated by USDA Forest Service research...

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring  an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book,
Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book, "Beetle Bedlam." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book, "Beetle Bedlam." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 4:14 PM

Why There's a Tree in the Bohart Museum of Entomology

Hanging posters in preparation for the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Aug. 27 are Steve Seybold lab associates Crystal Homicz (left), a UC Davis undergraduate student and research assistant, and  entomologist Megan Siefker, a junior specialist in the Seybold lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Siefker received her bachelor's degree in entomology in December, 2014 and Homicz is majoring in animal biology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There are nearly 8 million insect specimens in the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis. As of Friday noon, Aug. 25, there's also one tree. It's a fir. And no, it has nothing to do with the pending holiday season. It's for the...

Hanging posters in preparation for the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Aug. 27 are Steve Seybold lab associates Crystal Homicz (left), a UC Davis undergraduate student and research assistant, and  entomologist Megan Siefker, a junior specialist in the Seybold lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Siefker received her bachelor's degree in entomology in December, 2014 and Homicz is majoring in animal biology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hanging posters in preparation for the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Aug. 27 are Steve Seybold lab associates Crystal Homicz (left), a UC Davis undergraduate student and research assistant, and entomologist Megan Siefker, a junior specialist in the Seybold lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Siefker received her bachelor's degree in entomology in December, 2014 and Homicz is majoring in animal biology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hanging posters in preparation for the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Aug. 27 are Steve Seybold lab associates Crystal Homicz (left), a UC Davis undergraduate student and research assistant, and entomologist Megan Siefker, a junior specialist in the Seybold lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Siefker received her bachelor's degree in entomology in December, 2014 and Homicz is majoring in animal biology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A computer monitor at the Bohart Museum displays information about Western pine beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A computer monitor at the Bohart Museum displays information about Western pine beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A computer monitor at the Bohart Museum displays information about Western pine beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 25, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Bohart Museum Open House: 'Bark Beetle Forest Central'

Bohart Museum of Entomology volunteer Riley Gilmartin of Davis shows a chunk of wood with beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you attend the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 27, you'll learn all about bark beetles but you probably won't recognize the facility. It will be "Bark Beetle Forest Central," says Tabatha Yang, education and...

Bohart Museum of Entomology volunteer Riley Gilmartin of Davis shows a chunk of wood with beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum of Entomology volunteer Riley Gilmartin of Davis shows a chunk of wood with beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum of Entomology volunteer Riley Gilmartin of Davis shows a chunk of wood with beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of beetle galleries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 at 5:02 PM

Pursuit of a Tiny Beetle Leads to Coveted Honor

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with a newly described fungus, it causes thousand cankers disease of walnut and butternut trees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Her research pursuit of a tiny beetle that is wreaking havoc on walnut and butternut trees throughout the United States has led to a major honor. UC Davis entomology doctoral student Stacy Hishinuma has received and accepted a position in the USDA...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with a newly described fungus, it causes thousand cankers disease of walnut and butternut trees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with a newly described fungus, it causes thousand cankers disease of walnut and butternut trees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. In association with a newly described fungus, it causes thousand cankers disease of walnut and butternut trees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 27, 2015 at 8:42 PM

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