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Posts Tagged: Stagmomantis limbata

Ooh, an Ootheca!

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hide and seek. She hides 'em and we seek 'em. We've spotted as many as seven adult praying mantids at a time in our little pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif., but never once have we seen any of them laying eggs. Until now. The praying mantis lays...

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis, on a redwood stake in a milkweed planter in Vacaville, Calif., is trying to find a place to lay her egg mass, an ootheca. This image was taken Sunday night, Sept. 23. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This looks like a good spot. This praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, is native to North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ms. Mantis begins to work. Note the frothy cream-colored substance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the process. This Stagmomantis limbata did so in the open. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At dawn the next morning, we found her still on the stake with her hardening ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 1, 2018 at 4:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

The World of Praying Mantids: A Question Posed, A Question Answered

Mating pair of Stagmomantis limbata, a common mantis in Vacaville, Calif. The male did not lose his head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Last summer you may have happened upon praying mantids mating. Hopefully, the male didn't lose his head. Which begs a question asked by a reader: How long after mating does the female lay or produce her egg case (ootheca)? "Usually it takes a week or...

Mating pair of Stagmomantis limbata, a common mantis in Vacaville, Calif. The male did not lose his head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mating pair of Stagmomantis limbata, a common mantis in Vacaville, Calif. The male did not lose his head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating pair of Stagmomantis limbata, a common mantis in Vacaville, Calif. The male did not lose his head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating pair of mega mantids, Plistospilota guineensis. These mantids are part of Andrew Pfeifer's collection in Monroe County, N.C. See the result below! (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)
Mating pair of mega mantids, Plistospilota guineensis. These mantids are part of Andrew Pfeifer's collection in Monroe County, N.C. See the result below! (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)

Mating pair of mega mantids, Plistospilota guineensis. These mantids are part of Andrew Pfeifer's collection in Monroe County, N.C. See the result below! (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)

Praying mantis authority Andrew Pfeifer, who administers the public Facebook page, Mantis Keepers, captured this image of his Plistospilota guineensis ootheca. It's about the size of a large chicken egg. (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)
Praying mantis authority Andrew Pfeifer, who administers the public Facebook page, Mantis Keepers, captured this image of his Plistospilota guineensis ootheca. It's about the size of a large chicken egg. (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)

Praying mantis authority Andrew Pfeifer, who administers the public Facebook page, Mantis Keepers, captured this image of his Plistospilota guineensis ootheca. It's about the size of a large chicken egg. (Photo by Andrew Pfeifer)

Find the Praying Mantids in the Milkweed

Early morning silhouette: Find the two praying mantids. There's a female and a male clinging to the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's 6 a.m. Do you know where your praying mantids are? Well, yes. Two of them. Just before dawn broke, we walked around our pollinator (and prey) garden and spotted a pencil-thin male mantis, Stagmomantis limbata,  silhouetted on the...

Early morning silhouette: Find the two praying mantids. There's a female and a male clinging to the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Early morning silhouette: Find the two praying mantids. There's a female and a male clinging to the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Early morning silhouette: Find the two praying mantids. There's a female and a male clinging to the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As morning dawns, a female praying mantis,Stagmomantis limbata, checks out what's below. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As morning dawns, a female praying mantis,Stagmomantis limbata, checks out what's below. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As morning dawns, a female praying mantis,Stagmomantis limbata, checks out what's below. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, clings to a milkweed stem. Just above him: a female, not seen in this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, clings to a milkweed stem. Just above him: a female, not seen in this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, clings to a milkweed stem. Just above him: a female, not seen in this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hmm...where are you, my little buddy? The female praying mantis looks around for the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hmm...where are you, my little buddy? The female praying mantis looks around for the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hmm...where are you, my little buddy? The female praying mantis looks around for the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The next morning, the female praying mantis ambushes and eats a honey bee. The male? Nowhere in sight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The next morning, the female praying mantis ambushes and eats a honey bee. The male? Nowhere in sight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The next morning, the female praying mantis ambushes and eats a honey bee. The male? Nowhere in sight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 5:05 PM

Pardon Me, Is This My Best Side?

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She's easy to find. A European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa,  hangs out in our passionflower vine, Passiflora, the host plant of the Gulf Fritillary butterfly. Mantis religiosa is an introduced species, that is, non-native. We introduce...

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 4:16 PM

Let Us Prey!

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) clings to a showy milkweed leaf as she dines on a longhorn bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody eats in the pollinator garden. Everybody. The pollinators in our garden in Vacaville, Calif., sip the nectar. They include honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, sweat bees,  European wool carder bees, hover flies and assorted...

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) clings to a showy milkweed leaf as she dines on a longhorn bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer) clings to a showy milkweed leaf as she dines on a longhorn bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Andrew Pfeifer), clings to a showy milkweed leaf as she dines on a longhorn bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis is a cunning predator. The score: praying mantis: 1. Longhorn bee: 0. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis is a cunning predator. The score: praying mantis: 1. Longhorn bee: 0. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis is a cunning predator. The score: praying mantis: 1. Longhorn bee: 0. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nature's way; praying mantis devours her meal. The longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, erred in flying too close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Nature's way; praying mantis devours her meal. The longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, erred in flying too close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nature's way; praying mantis devours her meal. The longhorn bee, probably a Melissodes agilis, erred in flying too close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After her meal, the praying mantis climbs toward the top of the milkweed to look for more
After her meal, the praying mantis climbs toward the top of the milkweed to look for more "meal movement." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After her meal, the praying mantis climbs toward the top of the milkweed to look for more "meal movement." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 7, 2017 at 4:53 PM

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