Trinity County Cooperative Extension
University of California
Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Bug Squad Blog

BYOV--And That Means?

Teaching a class

The honey bee population is declining throughout the world, but not the interest in the art of queen rearing.   The annual class taught by bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey, manager of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey...

Teaching a class
Teaching a class

SUSAN COBEY shows a frame to the students in her 2008 class, "The Art of Queen Rearing." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Framed
Framed

FRAMED--This is a close-up of a frame from one of the hives at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen cells
Queen cells

CLOSE-UP OF QUEEN CELLS--This frame shows the peanut-shaped queen cells. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 5, 2009 at 6:00 PM

Tongue-Tied

Happy puppy

Blue merle mini-Australian shepherds have one. So do honey bees. What? A tongue. For a puppy, the tongue can symbolize pure happiness. For a worker honey bee: a solid work ethic. It's easy to take a photo of a happy puppy with her tongue hanging out,...

Happy puppy
Happy puppy

Blue merle mini-Australian shepherds have one: a tongue. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Industrious honey bee
Industrious honey bee

Just like the puppy above, the industrious honey bee has a tongue, too, or what entomologists call "mouthparts." Here's a pollen-dusted bee in the UC Davis Aboretum nectaring a flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 6:45 PM
Tags: honey bee (195), Penny Gullan (6), Peter Cranston (6), tongue (2)

It Might as Well Be...Spring

Up a tree

  If you like to take nature walks and lean against an occasional tree,  you might rub shoulders with a red-eyed, red-shouldered bug. On warm, springlike days,...

Up a tree
Up a tree

SOLITARY SOAPBERRY BUG climbs a tree in the UC Davis Arboretum, a good place for nature walks and insect observations. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In love
In love

SOAPBERRY BUGS IN LOVE--These soapberry bugs are doing what comes naturally. UC Davis biologist Scott Carroll says soapberry bugs are "good mothers and avid lovers." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 3, 2009 at 5:35 PM

Plan Bee

Pink Currant

Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796) lamented in his poem “To a Mouse” (1786) that “The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” He...

Pink Currant
Pink Currant

Honey bee nectaring Claremont pink currant (Ribes sanguineum var. glutinosum 'Claremont') (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of Honey Bee
Close-up of Honey Bee

CLOSE-UP of honey bee as she finds herself "in the pink," the pink being Claremont pink currant (Ribes sanguineum var. glutinosum 'Claremont'). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 2, 2009 at 5:18 PM

The Humble Bumble Bee

Queen Bumble Bee

A sure sign of approaching spring... As the cold weather subsides, out come the overwintering queen bumble bees. They're gathering nectar and pollen, building their nests and laying eggs. Lynn Kimsey, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department...

Queen Bumble Bee
Queen Bumble Bee

QUEEN BUMBLE BEE--The queen bumble bees are out again, after overwintering. Entomologist Lynn Kimsey found this young queen in Briggs Hall on the UC Davis campus yesterday. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peeking Out
Peeking Out

BUMBLE BEES occasionally build their nests in birdhouses. Here a Bombus melanopygus in a birdhouse last year on the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility grounds heads out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 27, 2009 at 5:58 PM

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