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Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Bug Squad Blog

How This Tiny Warrior Crashed the Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

He wasn't invited, but he crashed the party anyway. A few minutes before the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle began on the Briggs Hall lawn at the  University of California, Davis, water warrior Jasmine Morriseau, 10, noticed...

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jasmine Morisseau, 10, holds a male praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata, the tiniest warrior at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Filling water balloons for the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle are (from left) Yuan Ding, visiting graduate student; Dongyang Li, assistant project scientist; and Deguang Liu, visiting scholar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Some 2000 colorful water balloons are ready to be tossed. In the background is water warrior Lea Barnych, 4, whose mother Natalia Vasylieva is a researcher in the Bruce Hammock lab. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock catches a water balloon tossed at him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight  countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Splash! It was an international soakfest at the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, with eight countries represented. That's Hammock in the center getting sprayed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christophe Morisseau, a researcher in the Hammock lab and coordinator of the Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gregory Zebouni, account manager for the Hammock lab, gets drenched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The water warriors pose for a group portrait following the 16th annual Bruce Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear That Buzz? Beginning Beekeeping Courses at UC Davis!

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear that buzz? If you're thinking about becoming a beekeeper but don't know how and where to begin, the University of California, Davis, is offering beginning beekeeping classes in early August. The California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), directed...

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee frame. Find the queen bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Western Tiger Swallowtails: Not All Are 'Picture Perfect'

A Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on a butterfly bush. Note that it is missing part of its tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was "hit and miss." The predators hit, and they missed. Oh sure, they took a chunk out of these Western tiger swallowtails, but as they say, "a miss is as good as a mile." The predators? Could have been a hungry bird, praying mantis, or a...

A Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on a butterfly bush. Note that it is missing part of its tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on a butterfly bush. Note that it is missing part of its tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on a butterfly bush. Note that it is missing part of its tail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Western tiger swallowtail, nectaring on verbena, is missing part of its forewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This Western tiger swallowtail, nectaring on verbena, is missing part of its forewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Western tiger swallowtail, nectaring on verbena, is missing part of its forewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Western tiger swallowtail, structures all intact. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Western tiger swallowtail, structures all intact. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Western tiger swallowtail, structures all intact. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 7:40 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

Congrats to UC Davis Doctoral Students Who Study Spiders: AAS Awards

Rebecca Godwin with a statue of Theodore Roosevelt at the American Museum of Natural History, where she did some of her research. She won first place in the student poster research competiion at the recent meeting of the American Arachnological Society.

Chances are you're not thinking about spiders right now, but arachnid experts at the University of California, Davis, are. Two doctoral students from the Jason Bond laboratory, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, won first- and...

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says an international team of 16 researchers, including several UC Davis scientists,...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

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