Trinity County Cooperative Extension
University of California
Trinity County Cooperative Extension

Bug Squad Blog

A Quiet Veterans' Day

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's Veterans' Day, and after paying tribute to the military veterans (my ancestors have fought in all of our nation's wars, dating back to the American Revolution--and my other half is a U.S. Air Force veteran), I slip out the back door to our...

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, ecloses in Vacaville, Calif., on Nov. 11, Veterans' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary caterpillars have nearly skeletonized their host plant, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar                   crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Frillary caterpillar crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar crawls along on a passionflower vine stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 11, 2019 at 4:03 PM

Learn How to Raise Praying Mantids, Butterflies and Other Insects

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Ever wanted to raise praying mantids, butterflies, silkworm moths and other insects? Or arachnids such as tarantulas? Scientists at the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology will help you do just that. They've scheduled an open house on “Arthropod...

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker  will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)
Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Like to learn how to raise silkworm moths? Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker will show his new video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m. at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular insect to rear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, depositing an egg case, an ootheca. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Emerald Ash Borer Doesn't Just Target Ash Trees

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

The emerald ash borer, a wood-boring beetle native to northeastern Asia and now invasive in much of the United States, doesn't just target ash trees. The jewel beetle engages in host shifting. It's been detected in two non-ash species: the white...

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)
Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)
Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)

Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)

The Buzz Over Manuka Honey

A honey bee heads for a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, a plant also known as

Oh, the squabble over what is--and what is not--manuka honey. The battle is far from sweet. Manuka honey is produced in New Zealand and Australia, but New Zealand claims the manuka honey trademark. Australia says that's not fair. They want to use it,...

A honey bee heads for a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, a plant also known as
A honey bee heads for a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, a plant also known as "the New Zealand tea tree" or bush. Manuka honey is from Leptospermum scoparium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads for a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, a plant also known as "the New Zealand tea tree" or bush. Manuka honey is from Leptospermum scoparium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hats Off to UC Davis Ag Entomologist and Student Computer Scientists

Spraying a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

When UC Davis agricultural entomologist Christian Nansen wanted to develop a free smart phone application to help strawberry growers predict spray coverage to combat pests, he knew just where to go. The UC Davis Computer Science Club. And, now the...

Spraying a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)
Spraying a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

Spraying a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

A spray rig in a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)
A spray rig in a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

A spray rig in a strawberry field. (Photo by Christian Nansen)

The UC Davis Smart Spray team working on their project: (from left) Gabriel Del Villar and Alexander Recalde and agricultural entomologist Christian Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The UC Davis Smart Spray team working on their project: (from left) Gabriel Del Villar and Alexander Recalde and agricultural entomologist Christian Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Smart Spray team working on their project: (from left) Gabriel Del Villar and Alexander Recalde and agricultural entomologist Christian Nansen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 4:20 PM

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: cetrinity@ucdavis.edu