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Rob Page: Honey Bees' Social Behavior Rivals Our Own

Internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We humans exhibit complex social behavior. So do honey bees. “Honey bees exhibit complex social behavior that rivals our own,” internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis...

Internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Honey bees exhibit complex social behavior that rivals our own,” said internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey bees exhibit complex social behavior that rivals our own,” said internationally recognized honey bee geneticist Robert E. Page Jr., recipient of the 2019 UC Davis Distinguished Emeritus Award. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Chemical Ecologist Tom Eisner: Who Knew?

Thomas

Michael Jordan and Tom Eisner shared at least one thing in common: a rejection that hurt deeply and a recovery that ended amazingly. Jordan, the second-highest-scoring NBA player scorer (5,987 points), "wasn't good enough" to make his high school...

Thomas
Thomas "Tom" Eisner, the father of chemical ecology, accepts his National Medal of Science award in 1994 from President Bill Clinton for his "seminal contributions in the fields of insect behavior and chemical ecology, and for his international efforts on biodiversity." (Courtesy Photo)

Thomas "Tom" Eisner, the father of chemical ecology, accepts his National Medal of Science award in 1994 from President Bill Clinton for his "seminal contributions in the fields of insect behavior and chemical ecology, and for his international efforts on biodiversity." (Courtesy Photo)

Cornell University chemical ecologists and friends Tom Eisner (1929-2011) playing the piano and Jerry Meinwald (1927-2018) playing the flute. (Cornell University Photo)
Cornell University chemical ecologists and friends Tom Eisner (1929-2011) playing the piano and Jerry Meinwald (1927-2018) playing the flute. (Cornell University Photo)

Cornell University chemical ecologists and friends Tom Eisner (1929-2011) playing the piano and Jerry Meinwald (1927-2018) playing the flute. (Cornell University Photo)

Tom Eisner loved chemical ecology--and cars, including this Buick. (Courtesy Photo)
Tom Eisner loved chemical ecology--and cars, including this Buick. (Courtesy Photo)

Tom Eisner loved chemical ecology--and cars, including this Buick. (Courtesy Photo)

UC Davis chemical ecologist and distinguished professor Walter Leal will deliver the Founders' Memorial Lecture on Thomas Eisner on Nov. 19 at the ESA meeting in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis chemical ecologist and distinguished professor Walter Leal will deliver the Founders' Memorial Lecture on Thomas Eisner on Nov. 19 at the ESA meeting in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis chemical ecologist and distinguished professor Walter Leal will deliver the Founders' Memorial Lecture on Thomas Eisner on Nov. 19 at the ESA meeting in St. Louis, Mo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like to Raise a Butterfly? Or Another Insect? Attend Bohart Open House Nov. 16

A Gulf Fritillary nectars the blossom of a passionflower vine, its host plant, while another Gulf Frit flutters in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, sips nectar from the lavender blossom of a passionflower vine, its host plant. Another Gulf Frit flutters in to investigate. A female and male Gulf Frit find one another. Near them, Gulf Frit caterpillars...

A Gulf Fritillary nectars the blossom of a passionflower vine, its host plant, while another Gulf Frit flutters in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary nectars the blossom of a passionflower vine, its host plant, while another Gulf Frit flutters in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary nectars the blossom of a passionflower vine, its host plant, while another Gulf Frit flutters in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male and a female butterfly find another. These are Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male and a female butterfly find another. These are Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male and a female butterfly find another. These are Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar munching the leaves of a passionflower. Caterpillars will be displayed at the Bohart Museum open house on Nov. 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Frillary caterpillar munching the leaves of a passionflower. Caterpillars will be displayed at the Bohart Museum open house on Nov. 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Frillary caterpillar munching the leaves of a passionflower. Caterpillars will be displayed at the Bohart Museum open house on Nov. 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walking the line. A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar crawls along the stem of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Walking the line. A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar crawls along the stem of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walking the line. A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar crawls along the stem of a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like to learn how to raise Madagascar hissing cockroaches? Bohart scientists will tell you how on Nov. 16 at their open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Like to learn how to raise Madagascar hissing cockroaches? Bohart scientists will tell you how on Nov. 16 at their open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like to learn how to raise Madagascar hissing cockroaches? Bohart scientists will tell you how on Nov. 16 at their open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor, will show his newly produced video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 16. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)
Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor, will show his newly produced video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 16. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

Silkworm moth expert İsmail Şeker, a Turkish medical doctor, will show his newly produced video about the silkworm moth life cycle at 3 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 16. (Photo courtesy of İsmail Şeker)

A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by entomologist Lohit Garikipati, UC Davis alumnus. (Photo by  Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by entomologist Lohit Garikipati, UC Davis alumnus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, as identified by entomologist Lohit Garikipati, UC Davis alumnus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These Entomologists Are a Powerhouse of a Team

The UC Linnaean Games Team includes (from left) Hanna Kahl, Jill Oberski, Miles Dakin, Zach Griebenow and Brendon Boudinot, all in the doctoral program, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Not pictured: captain Ralph Washington Jr., who received his bachelor's degree in entomology at UC Davis and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They know their insects. Ask them a question about insects and entomologists, and odds are, they'll come up with the correct answer. And quickly. They've already won three national championships and are gearing up for a fourth. "They" are members of...

The UC Linnaean Games Team includes (from left) Hanna Kahl, Jill Oberski, Miles Dakin, Zach Griebenow and Brendon Boudinot, all in the doctoral program, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Not pictured: captain Ralph Washington Jr., who received his bachelor's degree in entomology at UC Davis and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The UC Linnaean Games Team includes (from left) Hanna Kahl, Jill Oberski, Miles Dakin, Zach Griebenow and Brendon Boudinot, all in the doctoral program, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Not pictured: captain Ralph Washington Jr., who received his bachelor's degree in entomology at UC Davis and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Linnaean Games Team includes (from left) Hanna Kahl, Jill Oberski, Miles Dakin, Zach Griebenow and Brendon Boudinot, all in the doctoral program, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Not pictured: captain Ralph Washington Jr., who received his bachelor's degree in entomology at UC Davis and is now a graduate student at UC Berkeley. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Student Maureen Page: Impacts of Honey Bees Vs. Native Bees

Maureen Page of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, will address the Davis Botanical Society meeting, “How I Spent My Field Season” on Thursday Nov. 14. The event takes place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Room 1022 of the Life Sciences Addition, corner of Hutchison and Kleiber Hall drives.

Honey bees versus native bees. What are the impacts of honey bee introductions on the pollination of Camassia quamash, a Sierra wildflower?  That's the topic that doctoral candidate and pollination ecologist Maureen Page of the Neal Williams lab,...

Maureen Page of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, will address the Davis Botanical Society meeting, “How I Spent My Field Season” on Thursday Nov. 14. The event takes place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Room 1022 of the Life Sciences Addition, corner of Hutchison and Kleiber Hall drives.
Maureen Page of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, will address the Davis Botanical Society meeting, “How I Spent My Field Season” on Thursday Nov. 14. The event takes place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Room 1022 of the Life Sciences Addition, corner of Hutchison and Kleiber Hall drives.

Maureen Page of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, will address the Davis Botanical Society meeting, “How I Spent My Field Season” on Thursday Nov. 14. The event takes place from 5 to 6 p.m. in Room 1022 of the Life Sciences Addition, corner of Hutchison and Kleiber Hall drives.

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